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Growing Spuds in the Region
by SIMON • Mon 10 Feb 2014 14:02

Not had the chance of yet to grow any spuds so far but plan on growing a few this year, just wondering how difficult is it to grow them. in the uk I grew tons, just put them in my allotment and dug them up when started to go yellow.

SIMON
35
Jan 2013
Re: Growing Spuds in the Region.
by edmoraz • Mon 10 Feb 2014 14:44

Its exactly the same here Simon and they are good at breaking up the often clay like soil.

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edmoraz
489
Feb 2008
Re: Growing Spuds in the Region.
by ihusker • Mon 10 Feb 2014 18:56

I planted some 2 years ago and they were all infested with Colorado beetle which they don't seem to bother about much in France.I tried everything to get rid of them but eventually gave up and the tops were completely eaten away. The following year a few came up with no beetle on them and they were good to eat. Having said that my French neighbours plant them and usually get good results.

ihusker
104
Feb 2006
Re: Growing Spuds in the Region.
by Dave • Tue 11 Feb 2014 10:24

We grow potatoes most years and they are usually fine. We haven't had any beetle issues but one year did get some sort of blight and a lot of the potatoes, well, dissolved.

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Dave
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Re: Growing Spuds in the Region.
by edmoraz • Tue 11 Feb 2014 11:56

That sounds like potato blight Dave, you need to be careful as the spores can survive in the soil ready to infest future crops. All infected top growth should be burn. The French spray with bordeaux mixture, youve probably seen it in veg patches, it makes the top growth go blue.

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edmoraz
489
Feb 2008
Re: Growing Spuds in the Region.
by virtdave • Wed 12 Feb 2014 00:02

I was told never to plant potatoes in the same place in successive years, because of disease concerns. I don't know if this applies to Europe (have not grown them there) but it seems to be important in California.

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virtdave
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Sep 2008
Re: Growing Spuds in the Region.
by edmoraz • Wed 12 Feb 2014 12:38

Yes we too have the same crop rotation for the same reasons. Potato blight can also affect tomatoes because they are from the same family. The spores can lie dormant over winter in rotting vegetation or even in your compost heap, as most heaps dont get hot enough to kill them off. This is why you should always burn your infected top growth.

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edmoraz
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Feb 2008
Re: Growing Spuds in the Region.
by SIMON • Wed 12 Feb 2014 14:20

you should follow a three or even better four year rotation system to stop diseases. I have done this in the UK, looks like this year in France will be spent preparing for next years crops.
I have heard that Europe is invested with the Colorado beetle, but reading up on it if the local land has not grown spuds before the effect of this pest could be minimum.

SIMON
35
Jan 2013
Re: Growing Spuds in the Region
by ihusker • Wed 12 Feb 2014 23:42

I'd just like to add that when I planted my spuds a couple of years ago they were planted in a part of the garden which had never been planted before- at least not in the last 20 odd years. I also used tubers from the garden centre so they should have been virus free, but I still got infected. I looked on a few forums and it seems that both France and Germany have problems but it's not notifiable as it is in the UK.

ihusker
104
Feb 2006
Re: Growing Spuds in the Region
by SIMON • Thu 13 Feb 2014 09:33

Blight is brought on by warm damp spring and summers. once the plant turns yellow cut the tops off and dig the spuds up they should store for around six months in the fridge. I am still using spuds dug up in September last year.

SIMON
35
Jan 2013
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