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new power to building
by wynne • Thu 13 Feb 2014 20:16

Hi all, after a bit of advice, just filling in the forms for connection to the grid for electricity and the form needs me to register what level of kVW I need, any body there to help with advice?
It is a new connection to a barn conversion.
Thanks :?: :?:

wynne
18
Feb 2014
Re: new power to building
by kowalczy • Thu 13 Feb 2014 21:20

I presume that you mean kVA or kW. The level you choose must be based on how much consumption you imagine you will use. Are you all electric, cooker (& how big?, heating (& how many rads and at what power rating? Can we presume that you are connecting to single phase? For a very small cottage or flat, 3kVA or 15kW should be sufficient. For a larger house 6kVA or 30kW would be more normal if you don't want the kettle to stop working each time you put a wash on. For a larger property and particularly if electric heating is involved, 9kVA or 45kW might be your choice.
The cost of your abonnement grows with each increase in power, but really it is not an issue for a comfortable life. You can change your incoming rating with a 'phone call to EDF, but there is a charge.

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kowalczy
41
Feb 2013
Re: new power to building
by wynne • Fri 14 Feb 2014 07:31

Thanks kowalczy, that information was useful. I will have electric heaters in the bedrooms and hall ways leading upstairs, a log burner down stairs and the usual sockets and lights around on each floor, along with dual cooking range, and the usual electric appliances. So I guess that it will be single phase 9kVA. Thanks again.

wynne
18
Feb 2014
Re: new power to building
by Jeanne • Tue 18 Feb 2014 20:48

Hi Wynne

Is there a meter already at the property or is this a new supply?

9kW (45 amps)is a good place to start. You did not give any indication as to whether you were insulating the walls of the property as this will have an effect on the size of the rads required to heat each space. Also you do not state how many bedrooms you are having. Bear in mind the size of the radiators for each of the rooms, if they are large rooms you will need large rads (possibly 1.5kW to 2kW) or multiples of. If you have a cold house and 4 rads of 2kW running on full to warm the house, you are using 8kW of your 9kW supply, turn on your kettle for a cuppa and you could suffer nuisance tripping of your main incoming breaker. I know I have used the rads as an example but it could be oven, washing machine, and two rads etc. You have to consider the loads that may be required at the same time, I assume there may be a water heater in there too somewhere (another 2kW load). The good thing is that it is simple to upgrade your supply as it is just a telephone call to your supplier to arrange this which is normally just a 10 minute job for the technician who turns up.

Good luck on your conversion.

Jeanne
232
Jun 2010
Re: new power to building
by patricksussex • Wed 19 Feb 2014 00:31

Hi
Don't really understand kVa but the higher tariff gives you 45KW, enough to power 22 and a half 2KW radiators?

patricksussex
14
Dec 2013
Re: new power to building
by wynne • Wed 19 Feb 2014 08:54

Hi all, Sorry it is a new connection, no meter on site. The options I have been given on the form "Formulaire de demande" are 12 Kva monophase 2 fils, or 36 Kva triphase 4 fils or 3 Kva monophase 2 fils sans comtage. The property will have Hot water tank, Electric Rads to bedrooms of which there are two, size of rooms are approx. 30 sq mtr which include en-suite areas. Down stairs fully insulated with a large wood burner, 50 sq mtr, included in this area is a kitchen, dinning and lounge all open plan. Usual appliances dual cooking, lpg gas ring, electric ovens, kettles, toaster, etc. I am not a technician and do not understand electrics(leave this for the experts). Any help would be appreciated. Thanks. Wyn

wynne
18
Feb 2014
Re: new power to building
by RobertArthur • Wed 19 Feb 2014 09:19

The maximum you can get for a new connection in single-phase (monophasé) is 12 kVA (about 12 kW for residential loads), corresponding with a maximum current of 60 A. The cabling to your premises will have to be dimensioned for this. You still can subscribe to an abonnement of 9 kVA (45 A) or 6 kVA (30 A).

For more power you have to go three-phase (triphasé), from 15 kVA to 36 kVA (3 x 60 A). In the EDF Bleu ciel information you'll still see the older connections in single-phase, going up to 18 kVA (90 A). For some or other reason the EDF doesn't update this type of information.

And even in single-phase you can have a lot of appliances connected, because there is the possibility of délestage (load-shedding): a module in the consumer unit senses the actual current demand, and if necessary switches off non-priority appliances, such as electric rads. To prevent the main-breaker (disjoncteur de branchement) coming into action and switching everything off.

Regards,

Robert

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RobertArthur
280
Mar 2009
Re: new power to building
by Jeanne • Thu 20 Feb 2014 19:26

Hi Wynne

Rob has given you good info above but you can never have enough so here goes:-

As it is a new supply you will have to get the installation certified by CONSUEL before EDF will connect you permanently. You can get a temporary supply which will normally be 6kW (30A) max until such time as you can get the certificate. You can arrange for this supply through EDF. EDF have been shortening the time you can have a temporary supply bit by bit over the last few years and current policy is 1 year. you can get an extension on this normally no more than 6 months but when you apply for the extension they will ask for an expected completion date.

With regard to the CONSUEL, there are minimum requirements to obtain a certificate i.e: all major appliances are on their own independently protected circuits (washer, drier, cooker, dishwasher, etc), 6 sockets for a kitchen 4 of which need to be above the worktop, 5 for a lounge up to 20m2 and 1 more for each 4m2 above, 3 for a bedroom etc. You will also have to install a RJ45 phone/network point in the lounge, kitchen and each bedroom and a number of TV points dependant upon the surface area of the property. This can add considerable cost to the installation but you will not be permanently connected without compliance to these requirements. A good electrician will be able to advise you on the best way to achieve this. Employing an electrician may not be the cheapest option but should ensure that you get the certificate, final payment being dependant on the issue of said certificate.

Finally, I have a similar installation to what you are planning and I have a 9kW/9kVA (45 Amp) supply and do not suffer any tripping.

Bon courage

Jeanne
232
Jun 2010
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