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Connecting electrics to new kitchen extension
by cbishopbailey • Tue 16 Aug 2011 16:53

Hi, I am going to put an additional consumer box in a new kitchen extension. This will require 12.5 meters of cable, from the main consumer box. A French electrical book suggests one can tack on to the end of the run of MCBS in the main consumer box. It would work but I am not convinced this is the best way to do it , and would not be done like this in the UK.
Any suggestions?
CBB

cbishopbailey
3
Aug 2011
Re: Connecting electrics to new kitchen extension
by cbishopbailey • Wed 04 Apr 2012 15:04

Hi Robert
Thanks for the info. Due to ill health I am just getting around to doing the electricts.I am having problem finding the answer to. I have two consumer units next to each other,one for the ground floor and one for first floor these are connected, plus the consummer unit in the kitchen extension. Is it possible to connect after the main supply switch so all three boxes can be supplied independantly.The kitchen consummer unit has phase and neutral connection blocks but the other two do not
Cheers Colin

cbishopbailey
3
Aug 2011
Re: Connecting electrics to new kitchen extension
by RobertArthur • Wed 04 Apr 2012 16:19

Colin,

A bit in a hurry right now, so a quick answer with several links.

There are three options for connecting several tableaux supplémentaire here in France, these are the single-phase (monophasé) examples:

Model I: standard approach. Only one RCD, serving also the coupure d'urgence function if this tableau supplémentaire is not inside the main building.

Model II: if the second consumer unit has more than one RCD and/or is not inside the main building (main breaker not easily accessible), you'll need a so called interrupteur d'urgence (also: interrupteur sectionneur}.

Model III: three more or less separate / autonomous consumer units, incoming supply from one main breaker, the disjoncteur de branchement. All cable sizes from the main breaker should respect the maximum current of your DB, the courant assigné. For these currents use a répartiteur, in a coffret de répartition. A simple mouse click is enough to calculate the minimum cable size.

Regards,

Robert

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RobertArthur
280
Mar 2009
Re: Connecting electrics to new kitchen extension
by cbishopbailey • Sat 07 Apr 2012 16:37

Hi Robert,
Thanks for swift reply and the great info. It looks like I wil need a repartiteur and coffret. I cannot find these in Leroy Merlin's catalogue. Are there other specialsts suppliers you can recommend.
Thanks once again
Cheers Colin

cbishopbailey
3
Aug 2011
Re: Connecting electrics to new kitchen extension
by RobertArthur • Sun 08 Apr 2012 08:35

Colin,

Try these internet sellers:

www.materielelectrique.com

www.elecsurtoile.fr

fr.farnell.com

fr.rs-online.com

Others on the internet, no personal experience with them, but frequently mentioned:

boutique.chamrion.com

www.d-home-otik.com

www.batirmoinscher.com

www.magelec.com

www.laboutiquedetoni.com

And many others.

By the way: any decent coffret électrique or boîte will do, as long as you can fix this répartiteur inside. Just look for the right format and size. Coffret de répartition indicates the function of this box, probably not easy to find this hardware when using this phrase in a google search.

Robert

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RobertArthur
280
Mar 2009
Re: Connecting electrics to new kitchen extension
by Jeanne • Sun 08 Apr 2012 11:28

Of course you could always go and get them at CGED at Gueret :)

Jeanne
232
Jun 2010
Re: Connecting electrics to new kitchen extension
by RobertArthur • Thu 06 Sep 2012 10:45

About the cable sizes to feed such an additional consumer box. I tried to summarize it in this hand drawn - sorry for being old fashioned - table. It is for single-phase, and for the type 1 connection. Meter and consumer unit close to each other, inside the house. Voltage drop of 2% between the tableau principale and the second one, the tableau divisionnaire.

Where meter and consumer unit are not "accolé", the type 2connection, you'll have to halve the distance (voltage drop of 1%) as explained by Promotelec in their latest 26th edition of "Locaux d'habitation". As a rule of thumb IMHO. The maximum voltage drop allowed between your compteur/disjoncteur de branchement and any point d'eclairage in your house is 3%. So it will depend on several factors in this type 2 connection. Custom solutions possible: taking into account actual voltage drop under full load between meter and consumer unit and cable lengths inside the house.

Robert

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RobertArthur
280
Mar 2009
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