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CLS Timber for studwork
by Robjelves • Mon 24 Mar 2014 23:14

Hi, does anyone know if anything that resembles what we call CLS timber is available?
I want to build a stud wall, but am unable to find timber of the right size it's either too thin or too thick.
I have noticed that the metal stud work is available but have no experience of this.
What have others used?

Robjelves
63
Dec 2013
Re: CLS Timber for studwork
by kowalczy • Tue 25 Mar 2014 09:53

Many years ago, but what seems like yesterday, when we arrived in France, we too were looking for timber to build stud walls. We could not find suitable material either. So we looked at the French system using metal profile instead. What a revelation. We have built six apartments and our own home using the same system and wood [sic] never return to wood studding. The set-up consists of principally two elements, RAIL, which is positioned on the floor and ceiling & MONTANTS which are the uprights. The simplest method, that I have found if working solo, is to screw a RAIL to the ceiling and cut another for the floor but do not fix it. Then cut a couple of uprights, one for each end of the proposed wall, and slide inside the RAILs and position the whole structure plumb, then fix both the uprights and the rails to the floor and walls. Once done cut more uprights and fit at 600mm intervals. If you intend to use oversize plasterboard, 2.6mts, 2.8mts, 3.0mts or 3.2mts, it is worth placing the intermediate uprights at 400mm centres. To join the RAILS & MONTANTS together, a small specialist tool is available for about 15€ to crimp the elements together or they can be screwed together.
A major advantage of the metal system is that the metal sections are straight and true, unlike the wood which has to be searched through to find straight lengths. A second factor is the speed of erection, I have got to the stage where I can build a 5mt wall, board it and joint it in a morning and undercoat and paint it the next day. Some folks will tell that the walls built are not stable, I would dispute this, I have built walls to 5.2mts high without any problems. If you are worried by such, the metal sections are available in widths of 48mm (standard), 70mm & 100mm.

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kowalczy
41
Feb 2013
Re: CLS Timber for studwork
by RobertArthur • Tue 25 Mar 2014 15:33

The good thing: pictures with text in English, help needed from translate google with the rest of the text (Dutch and French). See this article, metal profile in a nutshell.

Regards,

Robert

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RobertArthur
298
Mar 2009
Re: CLS Timber for studwork
by rictel • Wed 26 Mar 2014 17:44

Agreed, metal studwork is the way to go. It has been used in the uk for many years but more in commercial rather than domestic situations, but seems to be the norm here. It is quicker & does not suffer from any warping inherent in timber & is readily available at the "bricos". Never seen the crimping pliers for € 15 though & wonder where they come from & how long they last ? If you've a lot to do it's best to invest in a decent pair. ( pince a sertir )

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rictel
Moderator
231
Dec 2007
Re: CLS Timber for studwork
by kowalczy • Wed 26 Mar 2014 20:23

Agreed, metal studwork is the way to go. It has been used in the uk for many years but more in commercial rather than domestic situations, but seems to be the norm here. It is quicker & does not suffer from any warping inherent in timber & is readily available at the "bricos". Never seen the crimping pliers for € 15 though & wonder where they come from & how long they last ? If you've a lot to do it's best to invest in a decent pair. ( pince a sertir )
Said rictel
OK I got it wrong, they were 18.90€ http://www.leroymerlin.fr/v3/p/produits ... tir&xtcr=2 Had mine for eight years and they show no sign of tiredness after about 450 sq mts of use.

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kowalczy
41
Feb 2013
Re: CLS Timber for studwork
by rictel • Thu 27 Mar 2014 10:28

Agreed, metal studwork is the way to go. It has been used in the uk for many years but more in commercial rather than domestic situations, but seems to be the norm here. It is quicker & does not suffer from any warping inherent in timber & is readily available at the "bricos". Never seen the crimping pliers for € 15 though & wonder where they come from & how long they last ? If you've a lot to do it's best to invest in a decent pair. ( pince a sertir )
Said rictel
OK I got it wrong, they were 18.90€ http://www.leroymerlin.fr/v3/p/produits ... tir&xtcr=2 Had mine for eight years and they show no sign of tiredness after about 450 sq mts of use.
Said kowalczy
Thought € 15 was too cheap ! :wink:

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rictel
Moderator
231
Dec 2007
Re: CLS Timber for studwork
by Ceejays • Thu 27 Mar 2014 14:55

If you google the phrase......Bricolage : Ferraillage de cloison en plaques de plâtre......a whole host of useful DIY videos appear featuring Ivan on youtube......I personally found these particularly useful in installing the French rail system of stud walling in my old pile of stones several years ago...................

If you always do what you've always done you'll always get what you always got.
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Ceejays
30
Jan 2007
Re: CLS Timber for studwork
by Robjelves • Thu 27 Mar 2014 22:09

Thanks for all the replys. Seems to have made my mind up, I'll be giving the metalwork a go.
Is it usuall to insulate the void and if so what seems to work the best?

Robjelves
63
Dec 2013
Re: CLS Timber for studwork
by kowalczy • Fri 28 Mar 2014 09:18

Thanks for all the replys. Seems to have made my mind up, I'll be giving the metalwork a go.
Is it usuall to insulate the void and if so what seems to work the best?
Said Robjelves
Is it an exterior wall? If so then yes and then it is dependant upon the space available, For ext walls I personally use batts of Laine de Verre, the more rigid stuff. If it is an interior wall, it is up to you as to if you need to insulate. I would use Laine de Roche to insulate a bathroom/WC or a bedroom against noise. :oops:

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kowalczy
41
Feb 2013
Re: CLS Timber for studwork
by chris-le-bricoleur • Sun 30 Mar 2014 21:19

Is it usuall to insulate the void and if so what seems to work the best?
Said Robjelves
No isolation necessary on interiour walls. But I would aerate these if the walls are humid, see here pic. 4 and 5

chris-le-bricoleur
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