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Quetsche or Quince?
by TournesolKate • Tue 20 Apr 2010 19:18

Greetings my fellow francophiles!
I'm having a bit of a friendly disagreement with my boss. I work in a hotel and my directeur asked me to translate the menu into English for our English customers.
Everything was fine until I came to the desserts. We have a crumble of quetsches and mirabelles, but what are they in English?
I thought that quetsches were quinces, but now i think that mirabelles are quinces. My directeur thinks neither one are quinces, he thinks that quetsches are damsons and mirabelles are just mirabelles. He also thinks that quince is coing in French, but I think coing is a sort of pear and quince is a sort of plum. Confused? I am!!
If anybody knows for definite, I would be grateful.

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TournesolKate
142
Oct 2008
Re: Quetsche or Quince?
by Creusebear • Tue 20 Apr 2010 19:37

From what I have gathered:

Coings= Quinces
Quetsches = Damsons
Mirabelles = Mirabelle plums or prunes

So your boss is right. :roll:

Hope that helps!
C

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Creusebear
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May 2007
Re: Quetsche or Quince?
by Dave • Tue 20 Apr 2010 19:41

They are both plums. Specifically, damson (quetsche nf) and just Mirabelle plums (mirabelles nf).

qunice (coing nm) looks like a yellow pear (good for jam making)

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Dave
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Aug 2004
Re: Quetsche or Quince?
by virtdave • Tue 20 Apr 2010 19:46

A coing is definitely a quince. As an aside, quince trees (cognassiers) were once planted to mark property boundaries, since (unlike stones) they die when transplanted, once they've reached a few years growth. I have a nifty recipe for quince liqueur (rataffia), given me by a neighbor. We had an ancient cognassier in our pasture.....
A quetsche is a damson--a mirabelle is a (cherry)-plum, often just called a mirabelle in English, too.

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virtdave
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Sep 2008
Re: Quetsche or Quince?
by thewrights • Tue 20 Apr 2010 19:58

We always thought that mirabelles were unique to France, till I gave some mirabelle plum jam to my brother-in-law, who assured me that they are actually cherry plums!

"When you reach the end of your rope, tie a knot in it and hang on." - Thomas Jefferson
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thewrights
131
Oct 2007
Re: Quetsche or Quince?
by handyjack23 • Tue 20 Apr 2010 21:24

Watch out for the old coings. One of our dear and generous French neighbours gave us a jar of her newly-made coing jelly and we had the runs for days!

Mirabelles are small plums. We have got a lot in the freezer from last year.

Handyjack23

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handyjack23
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Aug 2007
Re: Quetsche or Quince?
by TournesolKate • Wed 21 Apr 2010 09:11

Yes, it's true, I looked them all up on google images. I shall hang my head in shame at work tomorrow.
:lol:
Thanks everybody!

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TournesolKate
142
Oct 2008
Re: Quetsche or Quince?
by Lynn • Wed 21 Apr 2010 21:42

I picked some cherry plums in UK last year, but they are far more red than French Mirabelles, they grow wild in Lincolnshire and so I have planted some pips which are growing nicely as this seems to be how they increase in UK. They are quite sweet, I have used them in crumbles and they don't need sugar. I'm hoping to bring some root cuttings back with me in June too to plant in our hedge.

Lynn
321
Apr 2008
Re: Quetsche or Quince?
by virtdave • Wed 21 Apr 2010 23:24

Growing plums (and most stone fruits) from pips can be interesting, but is rarely successful in getting any useful fruit. Perhaps you'd be rewarded by a new and wonderful result (after many years), which you could of course propagate and sell--but this is unlikely. Most experts recommend grafting onto a robust rootstock. However, you might ask the local farmers in Lincolnshire, maybe the particular mirabelle which grows there does indeed come true from seed.

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virtdave
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Sep 2008
Re: Quetsche or Quince?
by Lynn • Thu 22 Apr 2010 13:25

They don't seem to grow them on farms , just wild in the countryside, so that's why I shall get some root cuttings as I'm sure they will produce a better plant, just thought I'd have some fun with the pips. You're right, they don't make good trees normally, maybe I could have a go at grafting, nothing to lose!

Lynn
321
Apr 2008
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